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Expecting

Safe In Her Arms by Rabi Khan

Safe In Her Arms by Rabi Khan

Evan was born on an early day in March with both of his grandmothers watching. He is six now, and to this day, there is a lilt of expectation in his voice when he asks who he was named after. Evan knows the story well. Continue reading →

Making the World Our Winter Home

The Way Home by Tandi Venter

The Way Home by Tandi Venter

During winter, home is the sun around which an ever-tightening orbit of my life revolves. As the first snow falls, I retreat into the cocooning sanctuary of my four walls, saving myself from a frozen environment that no longer offers the food, water, and warmth necessary for life. Yet, the knowledge that eventually the rivers will thaw and rise, that green vitamin-filled shoots will emerge from the ground, and that the air will be sometimes mild, sometimes be steamy tempers my anxiety about winter. The circle of the year will always turn, and all I need to do is jump on board and wait ’til spring; then all will be well. Continue reading →

Everything Changed

Transformation II

Transformation II

We were coming home, but the street where we’d lived for so many years felt strange. Eerie shapes loomed in the dark on either side. I thought I might be seeing things, tired as I was at that late hour. But in the morning, the buildings were still there: apartment blocks, pigeon-hole town houses pressed side by side, a vast hole in the ground with cement and rebar pillars jutting out. Continue reading →

The Art of the Falling Leaf

Fall Leaves in Motion, Western Colorado by Curtis Martin

Fall Leaves in Motion, Western Colorado by Curtis Martin

Fall in New England is when nature’s beauty shifts to a deeper, starker, more mysterious artistry that is awe-inspiring. In spring and summer, everything works together to create a landscape full of busy plants, animals, insects, and birds. In the fall, after the harvest, labor ceases as silent leaves drop by the trillions in a palette of blazing hues. Later, in the winter, tiny crystalline masterpieces pile up almost infinitely, storing water’s power in the magnificence of their geometric splendor. Continue reading →

Walking Cemetery

Fall Morning in a Portsmouth Cemetary, New Hampshire, USA by Jerry Monkman

Fall Morning in a Portsmouth Cemetary, New Hampshire, USA by Jerry Monkman

Gray headstones stand silent sentry over buried loved ones. My German shepherd makes no distinction between them and any other rock-strewn landscape. This is just an open field where he runs, chasing crows and squirrels. He never catches them. The crows easily escape, flying off to safer havens, and the squirrels, too fast, too alert, make haste to the tree-lined buffer between the cemetery and the housing developments that border this little sanctuary. This is the only patch of open space left in my neighborhood. Continue reading →

Uncommon Ground

Street in Great Bazaar Khan Al-Khalil, Cairo, Egypt by Mark Daffey

Street in Great Bazaar Khan Al-Khalil, Cairo, Egypt by Mark Daffey

Maria arrives in Egypt on a Wednesday afternoon in November of 1998. I wave from behind a security line at the Alexandria airport as she breezes through customs without question. Her warm complexion and broad smile lights its way through my body. After three months of bearing myself in a foreign land, tears of relief pool and fall as she draws near. Comfort lies on her perfume in our embrace. Continue reading →

Common Courage

In early nineteenth century Scotland, there was a girl who loved the feeling of being admired by young men, but enjoyed it only briefly. She married young, as was the custom in that age and place. She hadn’t expected any great change in her circumstances after joining her life to that of a sturdy farmer, but then her husband’s family decided to pull up their roots and risk everything to try their luck in America. There was no question, she had to go with them in the wooden ship that slipped up and down enormous Atlantic swells, even though she had a small child and was pregnant. In Canada, they moved to fresh farmland, only then being cleared and settled, where she birthed more children as she slogged through the years. Some of them died young, but she survived years of ill-health, living into her eighties. Continue reading →

Once Upon Our Time

Creation of a New Story by Chris Henry

Creation of a New Story by Chris Henry

Once upon our time, a woman lived in a room of twisted mirrors. Though she was courageous, strong, and wise, she saw a cowardly, weak, silly, and useless woman reflected in the mirrors. So, that’s what she believed about herself. One day she could stand to look at the empty, distorted being in the mirrors no more, and she shattered them with one blow, revealing a window that had been hidden. Continue reading →

Sounds Beautiful

Silence by Fabio Calvetti

Silence by Fabio Calvetti

I have a writing chair, a place to which I often come with a cup of tea and pen in hand to let my thoughts roam. The chair, a family heirloom my mother passed on to me, has a simple design with two thick cushions lining a maple frame. My journal fits perfectly on one wide, flat maple arm. It was meant to be my writing chair. Continue reading →

A Larger Life

Art: Family Tree by Hilario Guttierrez

Art: Family Tree by Hilario Guttierrez

My grandmother had three tall wooden filing cabinets full of other people’s lives. Genealogy was her passion, and inside those drawers were records of deaths and births and detailed family trees. She’d pick up a name from among the Macaulays and another from the Clarks and Harrisons and try to put together the skeleton of that extinct beast, our larger family.
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